STRETCH MARKS

Stretch marks (striae) are indented streaks that often appear on the abdomen, breasts, hips, buttocks and thighs. Over time they become less noticeable. Stretch marks are particularly common in pregnant women, especially during the last trimester. Treatment can make stretch marks fade, but it won't completely remove them.

Stretch marks aren't painful or harmful, but some people feel distressed about the way they make their skin look.

Symptoms

Stretch marks don't all look alike. They vary depending on how long you've had them, what caused them, where they are on your body, and the type of skin you have. Common variations include:

  • Indented streaks or lines in the skin
  • Pink, red, black, blue or purple streaks
  • Bright streaks that fade to a lighter color
  • Streaks on the abdomen, breasts, hips, buttocks or thighs
  • Streaks covering large areas of the body

ENQUIRY

We would be delighted to serve you with our services, Let us get in touch with you

*Field Are Required

Causes

Stretch marks seem to be caused by a stretching of the skin. Their severity is affected by several factors, including your genetic tendency, degree of stress on the skin and cortisone level. Cortisone — a hormone produced by the adrenal glands — weakens elastic fibers in the skin.

  • Pregnancy: Between 50 and 90 percent of women who are pregnant experience stretchmarks during or after birth.
  • Puberty: Rapid growth is typical in young people going through puberty. This can lead to stretch marks.
  • Rapid weight gain: Putting on a lot of weight in a short space of time can cause stretch marks.
  • Medical conditions: Certain conditions can cause stretch marks, such as Marfan syndrome and Cushing’s syndrome. Marfan syndrome can lead to decreased elasticity in the skin tissue, and Cushing’s syndrome can lead the body to produce too much of a hormone that leads to rapid weight gain and skin fragility.
  • Corticosteroid use: Prolonged use of corticosteroid creams and lotions can decrease levels of collagen in the skin. Collagen strengthens and supports the skin, and a reduced amount can increase the risk of stretch marks.

The skin consists of three key layers. Stretch marks form in the dermis, or middle layer, when the connective tissue is stretched beyond the limits of its elasticity. This is normally due to rapid expansion or contraction of the skin.

As the body grows, the connecting fibers in the dermis slowly stretch to accommodate slow growth. However, rapid growth leads to sudden stretching. This causes the dermis to tear, allowing deeper layers of skin to show through. This can form stretch marks and contributes to the way they look.
Stretch marks eventually fade to a silvery, white, or glossy appearance, due to the pale fat beneath the skin becoming visible instead of the usual blood vessels.

They are more likely to develop and become more severe where there are high levels of circulating cortisone, or when cortisone is applied to the skin. Cortisol, the stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands, is converted into cortisone. This weakens elastic fibers in the skin.

Risk Factors

Anyone can develop stretch marks, but some factors increase your likelihood of getting them, including:

  • Being female
  • Having a personal or family history of stretch marks
  • Being pregnant, especially for younger women
  • Being overweight or obese
  • Rapidly gaining or losing weight
  • Using corticosteroid medication
  • Undergoing breast enlargement surgery
  • Having Cushing's syndrome, Marfan syndrome or certain other genetic disorders

Prevention

The best way to reduce the likelihood of getting stretch marks is to maintain a healthy weight. During pregnancy you'll gain weight over a relatively brief period. Work with your doctor to avoid gaining too much by eating well and exercising. This not only minimizes stretch marks but also is healthy for you and your baby.

Testimonials